Courses

Spring 2021

  • CLASSIC 30 - Classical Mythology

    Instructor(s): Rachel Morrison, Collin Moat, Kathryn Morgan, Patrick Callahan, Rhonda Sharrah, Benjamin Davis

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to myths and legends of ancient Greece and/or Rome, role of those stories in their societies, and modern approaches to studying them. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CLASSIC 51A - Art and Archaeology of Ancient Greece

    Instructor(s): Baisakhi Sengupta, Rachel Wood, Camille Acosta, John Papadopoulos, Carly Pope

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Greek art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CLASSIC 88GE - General Education Seminar Sequences: Helen of Troy: Ancient Beauty, Modern Portrait

    Instructor(s): Adriana Vazquez

    Consideration of ancient testimonia and modern interpretations of famed Helen of Troy, face that launched one thousand ships. Consideration of ancient Latin and Greek sources for marvel and wonder of her power, such as Homer's Iliad, Gorgias' Encomium of Helen, Euripides' Helen, and Ovid's Heroides; as well as material culture and artistic depictions of this celebrated beauty from antiquity. Consideration of modern interpretations of Helen, as in Wolfgang Petersen's 2004 film Troy, The Simpsons cartoon television series, and Anne Carson's 2019 play Norma Jeane Baker of Troy. Consideration of broader topics such as beauty standards from antiquity to modernity, uses and abuses of female sexuality and power, prevalence and consequences of male gaze, standards of femininity and construction of fixed gender identity, role of race and ethnicity in representations of beauty, and visibility of diverse bodies.

  • CLASSIC 88GE - General Education Seminar Sequences: Ancient Music, Modern Performance: Reimagining Homeric Hymns

    Instructor(s): Sebastian Peters-lazaro, Matthew Sweeney

    Homeric hymns are collection of narrative praise poems among oldest surviving texts from ancient Greece. They include some of most familiar Olympian pantheon stories, and offer glimpse of religious and cultural fluidity of ancient Mediterranean. Mat Diafos Sweeney and Sebastian Peters-Lazaro from award-winning performance company Four Larks create new digital adaptation of hymns combining dance, music, and theater. Survey of Homer's world and performance practice of oral poetry, including close reading of hymns. Students seek out contemporary and global perspective on this fascinating source material and explore cross-disciplinary strategies of adaptation. Study culminates in student-driven creative project. Students interested in any performance discipline, film/new media, or cultural studies are encouraged to enroll.

  • CLASSIC 89HC - Honors Contracts

    Instructor(s): John Papadopoulos, Kathryn Morgan

    Tutorial, three hours. Limited to students in College Honors Program. Designed as adjunct to lower-division lecture course. Individual study with lecture course instructor to explore topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities. May be repeated for maximum of 4 units. Individual honors contract required. Honors content noted on transcript. Letter grading.

  • CLASSIC M121 - Ancient and Medieval Political Theory

    Instructor(s): Giulia Sissa, Phillip Cantu, Jasmine Akiyama-kim

    (Same as Political Science M111A.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, St. Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and More and questions such as forms of government, citizenship, justice, happiness, rhetoric, religion, emotion. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CLASSIC 140 - Topics in History of Greek Literature: Feelings of Unrest: Political Emotions in Revolutionary Literature and Thought, 1776 to 1821

    Instructor(s): Simos Zenios

    From its birth in age of revolutions, modern concept of revolution is pulled in two opposite directions: On one hand, events that shook Atlantic and Mediterranean worlds at turn of 18th century are driven by principles of reason, natural rights, and universal norms. On other, they were impelled by violent passions that challenge their modernity and democratic character. Questions they posed are still valid: whether anger can be good guide for political action; whether love of one's place is threat to formation of inclusive politics; if solidarity exists without certain kind of fanaticism; and whether violence can be rational. Examination of set of revolutionary emotions--anger, love, enthusiasm, terror, disenchantment--in literary and political texts from Greek, American, French, and Haitian revolutions. Study also engages with theoretical treatments of role of emotions in politics, with focus on classical political thought.

  • CLASSIC 152A - Ancient City: Greek World

    Instructor(s): Sarah Morris

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 10 or 51A or Art History 20 or History 1A. Range of interdisciplinary approaches to study of Athens and/or cities of Greek world, including Asia Minor, south Italy, and Sicily. Approaches, themes, and periods (both ancient city and receptions of city from classical antiquity to modern era) vary depending on individual instructor and topic. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CLASSIC 163 - Ovid and Consequences

    Instructor(s): Francesca Martelli, Elliott Piros

    Lecture, three hours. Study of Ovid's "Metamorphoses" and persistence and extent of Roman poet's influence on subsequent literature, art, and film. Close analysis of Ovid's seminal text before turning to poem's classical, medieval, Renaissance, and modern imitators, from Apuleius to Shakespeare to Picasso and beyond. P/NP or letter grading.

  • CLASSIC 185 - Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary

    Instructor(s): Brent Vine, Anahita Hoose

    Lecture, three hours. Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading.

  • GREEK 3 - Elementary Greek

    Instructor(s): Richard Ellis

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 2. P/NP or letter grading.

  • GREEK 8C - Elementary Modern Greek

    Instructor(s): Angeliki Asprouli

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 8B. Introductory modern Greek sequence, with emphasis on spoken modern Greek. P/NP or letter grading.

  • GREEK 9C - Intermediate Modern Greek

    Instructor(s): Simos Zenios

    Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 9B. Intermediate-level program in modern Greek language study from communicative and task-based approach. Continued development of student understanding and use of Greek syntax and morphology through oral and written activities, reading, and listening. Students master basic communication skills, communicate in everyday real-life situations, comprehend simple passages, announcements, and advertisements, master basic rules of modern Greek grammar and syntax, read fluently, and write accurately. P/NP or letter grading.

  • GREEK 104 - Sophocles

    Instructor(s): Giulia Sissa

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 100. P/NP or letter grading.

  • GREEK 123 - Aristotle: Poetics and Rhetoric

    Instructor(s): David Blank

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 100. P/NP or letter grading.

  • LATIN 2 - Elementary Latin

    Instructor(s): Samuel Beckelhymer, Chengzhi Zhang

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 1. P/NP or letter grading.

  • LATIN 3 - Elementary Latin

    Instructor(s): Samuel Beckelhymer, Tianran Liu, James Piper, Silvio Curtis

    Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 2 or 14. P/NP or letter grading.

  • LATIN 102 - Terence

    Instructor(s): Sander Goldberg

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 100. P/NP or letter grading.

  • LATIN 119A - Readings in Roman Prose

    Instructor(s): Chris Johanson

    Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 100. Readings of selected Roman prose author(s). Topics may vary from year to year and may be organized in terms of chronology (Republican or imperial), literary genre (Roman biography, antiquarian learning, or science), and/or theme. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.